Appendix N:
Inspirational and Educational Reading


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DMG

Inspiration for all of the fantasy work I have done stems directly from the
love my father showed when I was a tad, for he spent many hours telling
me stories he made up as he went along, tales of cloaked old men -- who
could grant wishes, of magic rings and enchanted swords, or wicked
sorcerors and dauntless swordsmen.
Then too, countless hundreds of comic books went down, and the long-gone EC ones certainly had their effect. <EC Archives>
Science fiction, fantasy, and horror movies were a big influence.
In fact, all of us tend to get ample helpings of fantasy when we are very young,
from fairy tales such as those written by the Brothers Grimm and Andrew Long.
This often leads to reading books of mythology, paging through
bestiaries, and consultation of compilations of the myths of various lands
and peoples. Upon such a base I built my interest in fantasy, being an avid
reader of all science fiction and fantasy literature since 1950. The following
authors were of particular inspiration to me. In some cases I cite
specific works, in others, I simply recommend all their fantasy writing to
you. From such sources, as well as iust about any other imaginative writing
or screenplay you will be able to pluck kernels from which grow the fruits
of exciting campaigns. Good reading!

Inspirational Reading:
Anderson, Poul. THREE HEARTS AND THREE LIONS; THE HIGH CRUSADE; THE BROKEN SWORD
Athony, Piers "Split Infinity" series <Grognardia: 2008.11.25>
Bellairs, John. THE FACE IN THE FROST
Brackett, Leigh. <PF: The Sword of Rhiannon, Skaith series, et al.>
Brown, Fredric. -
Burroughs, Edgar Rice. "Pellucidar" Series; Mars Series; Venus Series
Carter, Lin. "World's End'' Series <6 books>
de Camp, L. Sprague. LEST DARKNESS FALL; FALLIBLE FIEND; et al.
* de Camp & Pratt. "Harold Shea" Series; CARNELIAN CUBE
Derleth, August. -
Dunsany, Lord. -
Farmer, P. J. "The World of the Tiers" Series; et al.
Fox, Gardner. "Kothar" Series; "Kyrik" Series; et al.
*Howard, R. E. "Conan" Series
Lanier, Sterling.  HIEROS JOURNEY <2nd book - GG> <Grognardia: 2008.11.25>
*Leiber, Fritz.  "Fafhrd & Gray Mouser" Series; et al.
*Lovecraft, H. P. -
* Merritt, A. CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL <audiobook, from archive.org>; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al. <PF: The Ship of Ishtar>
Moorcock, Michael. STORMBRINGER; STEALER OF SOULS; "Hawkmoon" Series (esp. the first three books)
Norton, Andre. -
Offutt, Andrew J. editor SWORDS AGAINST DARKNESS III.
Pratchett, Terry Disc World <Grognardia: 2008.11.25>
Pratt, Fletcher BLUE STAR; et al.
Saberhagen, Fred. CHANGELING EARTH; et al.
St. Clair, Margaret. THE SHADOW PEOPLE; SIGN OF THE LABRYS
Tolkien, J. R. R.  THE HOBBIT, "Ring Trilogy"
*Vance, Jack. THE EYES OF THE OVERWORLD; THE DYING EARTH; et al.
Weinbaum, Stanley. -
Wellman, Manly Wade. <PF: John the Balladeer series, et al.>
Williamson, Jack. -
Zelazny, Roger.  JACK OF SHADOWS; "Amber" Series; et al.

* The most immediate influences upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, REH, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, HPL, and A. Merritt; but all of the above
authors, as well as many not listed, certainly helped to shape the form of the game. For this reason, and for the hours of reading enjoyment, I heartily recommend the works of these fine authors to you.

<
Gord the Rogue series
Dragonlance Chronicles
Dragonlance Legends
The Crystal Shard
Darkwalker on Moonshae
AD&D Adventure Gamebooks
>

<Grognardia:
add Star Man's Son, by Andre Norton;
add Cugel's Saga, Rhialto the Marvellous, by Jack Vance>



 

Brown, Fredric.

Burroughs, Edgar Rice. "Pellucidar" Series; Mars Series; Venus Series
 

Carter, Lin. "World's End'' Series


* de Camp & Pratt. "Harold Shea" Series; CARNELIAN CUBE


Derleth, August.

    The Dweller in Darkness. (CTHUGA) <link>
    The Thing That Walked On The Wind (ITHAQUA) <link>
    The Trail of Cthulhu.


Dunsany, Lord.

Farmer, P. J. "The World of the Tiers" Series; etal.
    The Maker of Universes (1965), The Gates of Creation (1966), A Private Cosmos (1968), Behind the Walls of Terra (1970), The Lavalite World (1977) and More Than Fire (1993).

Lanier, Sterling. HIEROS JOURNEY

Leiber, Fritz. "Fafhrd & Gray Mouser" Series; et al.

Lovecraft, H. P.
    <H.P. Lovecraft Omnibux, vol. I : At the Mountains of Madness>
    <H.P. Lovecraft Omnibux, vol. II : Dagon and Other Macabre Tales >
    <H.P. Lovecraft Omnibux, vol. III : The Haunter of the Dark>
        <The above 3, published by Grafton, should contain everything that he wrote that was published><check>
    <H.P. Lovecraft : A Biography, by L. Sprague de Camp, Barnes & Noble Books - being written by LSDC, this one may be of interest>

Merritt, A. CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al.
Moorcock, Michael. STORMBRINGER; STEALER OF SOULS; "Hawkmoon" Series (esp. the first three books)

Norton, Andre.

Offutt, Andrew J., editor SWORDS AGAINST DARKNESS Ill.

* Pratt, Fletcher, BLUE STAR; et al.

Saberhagen, Fred. CHANGELING EARTH; et al.

St. Clair, Margaret. THE SHADOW PEOPLE; SIGN OF THE LABRYS

Tolkien, J. R. R. THE HOBBIT; "Ring Trilogy"

Vance, Jack. THE EYES OF THE OVERWORLD; THE DYING EARTH; et al.
    Happy that you have read a couple of the greats of fantasy and enjoyed them. As for style, I find that of Jack Vance more compelling than any other author in the genrs.

    Cheers,
    Gary

    Planet of Adventure is my favorite work of his, if i actually have one.. -- GG

Weinbaum, Stanley.
Wellman, Manly Wade.
Williamson, Jack.

Zelazny, Roger. JACK OF SHADOWS; "Amber" Series; et of.

The most immediate influences** upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, REH, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, HPL, and A. Merritt; but all of the above
authors, as well as many not listed, certainly helped to shape the form of the game. For this reason, and for the hours of reading enjoyment, I heartily recommend the works of these fine authors to you.

<*>, added to list?



Howdy Predavolk,

As with many things, naming a favorite isn't my bag. I must say, though, that I enjoyed the full length novel about Conan, and "Red Nails" is an outstanding tale of chilling adventure action that I would love to be able to emulate in an RPG module.

JRRT's "rings Trilogy" was too slow paced for me, although I did enjoy The Hobbit.

High on the list of other influences for my FPR game design are:
Jack Vance, de Camp & Pratt, Fritz Leiber, Saberhagen, Merritt, and Moorcock. So many excellent old fantasy yarns...

Cheers,
Gary
 


Driver wrote:
Gary,

Another "just curious" question. If you were going to assign an AD&D alignment to Cugel the Clever from Jack Vance's "Dying Earth" stories, what would it be? He doesn't seem to *actively* seek to promote evil, or any other ethos for that matter, but then again he's a git, and does some pretty nasty stuff in the stories.

I'd put him as Chaotic Neutral, but I'm curious how you'd rate him.


Cugel is Chaotic evil--note the small e there. He isn't demonic, but he is malign, never seeking to do good for anyone but himself, never hesitating to sacrifice anyone in search of his self interest.


Quote:
(I've just read the "Dying Earth" stories for the first time in years, and had forgotten how much I like Vance. Now it's off to the library for "Planet of Adventure" and "Demon Princes."


I've just picked up new copies of the five novels about the "Demon Princes" and the sequel to Ports of Call, so I expect to be reading and enjoying Vance's work a good bit this summer. Planet of Adventure is my favorite work of his, if i actually have one..


Quote:
I also just got a copy of "Princess of Mars" with a Ray Bradbury introduction. I like a lot of Bradbury's work, but felt the introduction was bush-league, as he damns Burroughs with faint praise, suggesting that some part of one's adult brain needs to be shut off to enjoy the Mars novels. Since Bradbury is often dismissed as a fluff-writer by hard sci-fi buffs, I found this sad and amusing, and wondered why they didn't get an introduction writer who was still capable of enjoying Burroughs without eyebrow arched.

There was also more bio about Bradbury on the back cover than about Burroughs. :(

Anyway, that's just a side rant, since I know you enjoy both Bradbury and Burroughs.)

Have a great weekend!


Bradbury is the finest author of imaginative short stories IMO, and if any other authors dismiss his work it is our of green-eyed jealousy i should think.

ERB's work is indeed juvenile but a lot of fun to read. Most of the stories are surely pot poilers with formula plots, but I enjoyed them, and there was a good deal of creative imagination behind the tales.

i do wonder why they had Ray write an intro when his heart wasn't in it. there muist be several name authors who could have done an enthusiastic piece.



 


DMPrata wrote:
Gary, I made an observation today that may be insightful, or may be just plain stupid, depending on your response! :lol: I'm well aware of your position as to the minimal impact of Tolkien's works on your writing. In the published World of Greyhawk setting, though, is it possible that Queen Yolande of Celene and Count Hazendel of Sunndi were in some way inspired by Lady Galadriel of Lothlórien and Lord Elrond Half-elven of Rivendell?


Not by any stretch of the imagination is there any such inspiration.
 
 

Quote:
Please forgive the long post. I'm really not one of those Tolkien crackpots you adore so much :wink: . I'm mostly just trying to get a handle on these two NPC's, as they figure prominently in my own Greyhawk campaign. If, indeed, the "Creator" modelled them after the Tolkien characters, then I would have a wealth of background flavor for them at my fingertips, and could develop them thusly. As always, your thoughts are greatly appreciated. Thanks!

The NPCs are as they are prensnted in the text, no more, no less. Certainly individual DMs can alter and augment the information as desired, for that was the express purpose for the work as presented.

Gary
 


JASON THE RULESREADER wrote:
Gary,

I just found my SAGA OF OLD CITY, ARTIFACT OF EVIL books. Found them in storage after 10 years.......

Just wondering, does the combat in those books follow the logic and flow of AD&D? It seems like it does, almost reading like a combat example without the mechanics......
 


Just so.

I wroite those books to give readers dramatic examples of what an adventure world operating on the AD&D game principles ouuld be like.

Cheers,
Gary

Bellairs, John. THE FACE IN THE FROST.

Rowena Morrill - The art of - A face in the frost
 
 


*de Camp, L. Sprague.
LEST DARKNESS FALL; FALLIBLE FIEND; et al.


 


 


 


Farmer, P. J. "The World of the Tiers" Series; et al.
    <The Maker of Universes (1965), The Gates of Creation (1966), A Private Cosmos (1968), Behind the Walls of Terra (1970), The Lavalite World (1977) and More Than Fire (1993).>
    <Moldvay: The Gates of Creation; The Maker of Universes; A Private Cosmos, et al.>


Lanier, Sterling. HIEROS JOURNEY <2nd book - GG> <Grognardia: 2008.11.25>

 

Lovecraft, H. P.
    <H.P. Lovecraft Omnibux, vol. I : At the Mountains of Madness>
    <H.P. Lovecraft Omnibux, vol. II : Dagon and Other Macabre Tales >
    <H.P. Lovecraft Omnibux, vol. III : The Haunter of the Dark>
       <The above 3, published by Grafton, should contain everything that he wrote that was published><check>
    <H.P. Lovecraft : A Biography, by L. Sprague de Camp, Barnes & Noble Books - being written by LSDC, this one may be of interest>

Merritt, A. CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al.
    <Moldvay: Merritt, A.E. - The Moon Pool; Dwellers in the Mirage; The Ship of Ishtar, et al.>


Moorcock, Michael.
STORMBRINGER; STEALER OF SOULS; "Hawkmoon" Series (esp. the first three books)
<Melibonean Mythos>

Hawkmoon: Science & sorcery in Earth's far future (Box set)
The Shattered Isle: Rebels against the mutant master


Norton, Andre.
    <Moldvay: Witch World; The Year of the Unicorn; The Crystal Gryphon, et al.>


 


 



 

Pratt, Fletcher, BLUE STAR; et al.
    <Moldvay: The Blue Star; The Well of the Unicorn>

 

Saberhagen, Fred. CHANGELING EARTH; et al.

St. Clair, Margaret. THE SHADOW PEOPLE; SIGN OF THE LABRYS

Tolkien, J. R. R. THE HOBBIT; "Ring Trilogy"
    Interview with Gary Gygax


Weinbaum, Stanley.


Wellman, Manly Wade.


 

http://paizo.com/products/btpy85jz?Who-Fears-the-Devil-The-Complete-Silver-John
^ The above is a complete compilation of all of the Silver John stories^

^Research the movie "The Legend of Hillbilly John"^


Williamson, Jack.

The most immediate influences* upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, REH, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, HPL, and A. Merritt; but all of the above
authors, as well as many not listed, certainly helped to shape the form of the game. For this reason, and for the hours of reading enjoyment, I heartily recommend the works of these fine authors to you.

<*>, add to list?
 


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ourph
Hey Gary!

I'd like to start by thanking you for including the suggested reading lists in the DMG and Basic set books. Not only has the game you created led me to countless hours of fun and fellowship, it also helped me discover a lot of great fiction I might otherwise have missed.

One of the authors listed, John Bellairs, mentions The Collected Lectures of John L. Stoddard in his book The House With A Clock In Its Walls. Having recently acquired a set of this lecture series, it occurs to me that (while not the most gripping read) they would likely provide a DM with countless ideas and descriptions with which to inspire his own games (Stoddard's description of the fjords of Norway, in particular, was outstanding and really drives home how much geography shaped the Viking culture). I was wondering if you have ever read any of the Stoddard Lectures and if so, what you thought of them? On another related note, if you could go back and re-write your suggested reading list today, are there any new authors or works you would add?

Let me just add that I'm praying that God blesses you with many more years of happy and healthy living. Stay well.


Hi Ourph,

While I have read a lot, I never did read the lectures of the Good Mr. Stoddard. however, we read a lot about Scandanavia and the fjords in grammar school, and I even had to do a color drawing of a longship 

About the only additions I'd make to the recommended reading list in the old DMG would be the names of authors Glenn Cook and Terry Pratchett.

Thanks for your good wishes,
Gary



 

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