Fishing
 (1, WIS, +1)


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WSG

Fishing (1*, WIS, -1) (DSG): The character with this proficiency is skilled in the art
of fishing, both with a hook and line and with a net. For each hour
that the character spends fishing, he can make a Proficiency
Check. Failure means that no fish are caught. A successful check
means that at least one fish is caught. To determine the number
of fish, subtract the character’s d20 roll from his Wisdom score.

One fish provides 1/2 of the daily rations needed to feed a single
character. The DM can modify this amount to reflect the sizes
and types of fish that are caught. Of course, if an areacontains no
fish then none are caught, regardless of the character’s rolls.

The DM can also modify the time required for the Proficiency
Checks to reflect how many fish are in the area. The check might
be made every turn, for example, in a crowded pool, while it might
only be allowed after six hours of fishing in an area where the fish
are few and far between.

* This proficiency requires a d20 roll for success (Proficiency Check) each time it is used.
 

    Fishing (WSG): A character with proficiency in this skill is generally
more successful at netting or hooking a substantial catch. See
the text on "Fishing" in the section on Food and Water for details
on how to determine the success of a fishing attempt. <e>

Table 32: FISHING SUCCESS

                                   Time of Day
Type of Area Daytime Night Dawn/Dusk (Twilight) <>
    Poor d4-2 d4 d4+2
    Fair d6-3 d6-1 d6+2
    Good d6-2 d+2 d8+2

    When all is said and done, fishing success depends primarily
on where the fishing attempt is made. If the fish in a body of water
are abundant and hungry, even a totally unskilled fisherman can
drop a hook and line or a net int othe water and come up with
something. And if there simply are no fish in the area, even the
most knowledgeable angler will come back empty-handed.

    Each entry on the table represents a number generated by a
die roll, and in most cases a modifier that is applied to that roll.
The resulting number represents how many fish are caught in
one hour by one character with a baited hook && line.
The use of a net will increase the take to 50% more than the modified die roll.
If a negative modifier brings the die-roll result to zero or lower,
no fish are caught regardless of the gear being used.

    A character with fishing proficiency receives a +2 modifier
to his die roll in any fair or good AREA. (If the AREA is a poor spot for
fishing to begin with, his prowess will not help him.)

    More than one character can fish the same AREA at the same
time, but each extra member of the fishing group has his die roll
modified by -1 cumulatively: -1 for the second character, -2
for the third one, and so on. (A separate roll of 1d6 is made for
each fisherman.)

    It is possible for one or more characters to fish the same spot
for more than one hour, but each character must take a further -2
modifier to his die roll for each hour beyond the first one spent in the
same spot. As long as at least one member of the fishing
group catches at least one fish in any given hour, the spot may
still yield more fish and characters can stay longer in hopes of
increasing thier catch. But as soon as each fisherman gets a result
of zero or lower in the same hour, the spot is "fished out" and will
not yield any more fish for at least one day.

    Example: Character A has proficiency in fishing; characters B
and C do not. All three sit down at a good spot at night and try
their luck with hooks and lines. During the first hour, character A
will catch 1d6+4 fish (counting his proficiency bonus); character
B will bring in 1d6+1 (counting the penalty for being the extra
member of the group); and character C will catch 1d6 (because
he is the second extra member). If they keep fishing for a
second hour, each one takes a -2 modifier to his die roll: 1d6+2
for character A, 1d6-1 for B, and 1d6-2 for C. During the third
hour, their die rolls decrease by another -2; 1d6 for A, 1d6-3 for
B, and 1d6-4 for C. If they continue to fish for a fourth hour, there
is a chance that the spot will have become fished out since all
three characters are now capable of getting results of zero or
lower.

    The determination of whether a fishing spot is poor, fair, or
good is basically up to the DM, but some guidelines
may be helpful. A cool, fast-running mountain stream is a good
spot for trout; a shallow and muddy pond or lake is a good spot for
carp or pike; a clear, deep lake is a good spot for bass. Thus, all of
these bodies of water will be good (or at least fair) spots for fishing.
In general, fishing is better if it is done from a boat moored in
the middle of a body of water than if it is done from shore. A
swamp or bog is generally a poor place for fishing; so is a stagnant,
shallow creek. In hot or sunny weather, fish will congregrate
in places where they can be shaded by trees or overhanging terrain;
such a spot will be fiar or good, while an unshaded spot
nearby on the same body of  water will be a poor one.

SUMMARY
* The use of a net will increase the take to 50% more than the modified die roll.
* A character with fishing proficiency receives a +2 modifier to his die roll in any fair or good area.
* More than one character can fish the same area at the same time, but each extra member of the fishing group has his die roll modified by -1 cumulatively:
-1 for the second character, -2 for the third one, and so on.
* (A separate 1d6 roll is made for each fisherman).
* It is possible for one or more characters to fish the same spot for more than one hour,
but each character must take a further -2 modifier to his die roll for each hour beyond the first one spent in the same spot.